Every #1 Song of the 1980s – Series 3

This series peeks into March after finishing with February.  Some of the years to this point had some solid champions, while others had a lot of one and two week stays.  Of course, the measurements used back then were much less precise (surveys of radio stations, record stores) compared to what we have now.  But I like this better – certainly better than the 8-10 number ones per year.  The ground rules and such are here.  So what are we adding to the list? (Series 2 is here)

“Billie Jean” by Michael Jackson (1983) – Do this require a write-up? Really? I am not sure if anything will get a perfect score because I’m a grinch. But in terms of cultural imprint, a time capsule into the 1980s and a pop song which holds up more or less completely? Come on now. (49 points)

“Father Figure” by George Michael (1988) – This is a pretty perfect pop song. The album Faith had a LOT of really good songs, it is arguably the best album of the decade. (I have not put much thought into that – but it is in the picture) So it is something to say that this is the best one – and actually sort of does evoke the Taxi Driver-y video. But the way videos were so prevalent back then, I wonder how much of the is symbiotic – can I remember it another way? I don’t know. (47 points)

“Jump” by Van Halen (1984) – When I waved the criteria wand over this, this came up very high. And it should – Van Halen was one of the decade’s most significant bands, and this was both their biggest hit, and a perfect amalgam of rock and synthpop which would embody the time. It is not my favorite Van Halen song – and probably not in the Top 5 if I think hard enough. (1979’s “Dance the Night Away” is an all-time earworm) But the significance carries it a long way – and it is damn good. (45 points)

“Livin on a Prayer” by Bon Jovi (1986) – It’s my generations (well at least among white people I suppose) “Don’t Stop Believing” or whatever. Some rock song which plays in the bar and everybody knows the words. Like “Jump”, it hits a lot of the significance metrics – although it is not their best song, or the best of their four number 1s. But history has ruled on this, and I can’t blame it. (45 points)

“How Will I Know” by Whitney Houston (1986) – I noted this in Series 2, but given how difficult the end of her deal was, it is striking how easy it looked, especially early. As Bill Simmons noted when writing about her death – she should have been my age’s Streisand – but instead it was gone in 8 years. The spark is so evident here. (43 points)

“Careless Whisper” by Wham f/ George Michael (1985) – The number one song of 1985, it was released in the UK as a George Michael solo song. For the States, it was Wham! brand extension – which did not seem necessary in retrospect. Now this song feels pretty cheesy, but loveable. (40 points)

“9 to 5” by Dolly Parton (1981) – The early 80s had a lot of country crossover and remnants of the 70s. Of course, the former meant Dolly Parton. I remember this being a pretty big deal vaguely – I was 3. Listening to it now – the crossover appeal still holds, even it is dated. (35 points)

“Crazy Little Thing Called Love” by Queen (1980) – If there are knowing snickers now about a video like “Father Figure” given the truth about George Michael, the video for Queen’s first #1 in the US is a howler. Like “Let’s Dance” by David Bowie – it is tempting to condescend because it is not in the league of their 70s stuff like “Somebody to Love” or “You’re My Best Friend” or whatever – but it is a bit unfair. After all, if it’s pop cheese – it still helps to be good. It’s dated and a bit silly, but my affection is real. (32 points)

“Kyrie” by Mr. Mister (1986) – This sounds exactly like a random song from the 1980s I’d barely remember. Indeed I did. I barely remember the band – but there they were with multiple #1s. (I know “Broken Wings” more) It is hard for me to generate much feeling. (30 points)

“I Love a Rainy Night” by Eddie Rabbitt (1981) – Early 80s country crossover. Like a lot of the stuff here, it suffers by not really culturally fitting with a lot of the other #1s. It feels like a relic. But to be fair, it is a perfectly fine example of what it is. (26 pts)

“Lost in Your Eyes” by Debbie Gibson (1989) – There is very little defensible about this song, aside from the idea that Gibson wrote it herself, and it has some 80s kitsch going for it. I am sure there were people who got married to this. Yuck! (26 points)

“Seasons Change” bu Expose (1988) – Another silly ballad, but unlike Debbie Gibson, I had to remember Expose was a thing. Honestly, this song is fairly inoffensive. (24 points)

“Baby, Come to Me” by Patti Austin and James Ingram (1983) – Sometimes songs like this are the sort of thing that only happened in the 1980s. Yeah yeah there is the synth pop, but songs like this – smooth R and B, something Vandrossy – also is very much a time capsule. Of course when I was a it seemed like stuff only grown ups listen to. It still does. (22 points)

“Do That to Me One More Time” by Captain and Tennilee (1980) – This is a relic of the 1970s and sounds like it. Of course I had to pilfer a Midnight Special clip for a recording. It’s not their best song – and on its own, it’s not terrible (so far only 2 of the 48 songs are outright bad) – but it is decidedly unmemorable.

The tally through early March?

Song Artist
1 Billie Jean Michael Jackson
2 Rock With You Michael Jackson
3 Father Figure George Michael
4 Jump Van Halen
5 Livin on a Prayer Bon Jovi
6 Down Under Men At Work
7 Faith George Michael
8 How Will I Know Whitney Houston
9 Like a Virgin Madonna
10 Centerfold J Geils Band
11 The Tide Is High Blondie
12 Careless Whisper Wham featuring George Michael
13 Walk Like an Egyptian Bangles
14 Karma Chameleon Culture Club
15 Celebration Kool and the Gang
16 So Emotional Whitney Houston
17 Two Hearts Phil Collins
18 Need You Tonight INXS
19 Every Rose Has Its Thorn Poison
20 My Prerogative Bobby Brown
21 Got My Mind Set on You George Harrison
22 Owner of a Lonely Heart Yes
23 Maneater Darryl Hall and John Oates
24 Open Your Heart Madonna
25 The Way You Make Me Feel Michael Jackson
26 Say, Say, Say Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson
27 9 to 5 Dolly Parton
28 Straight Up Paula Abdul
29 That’s What Friends Are For Dionne Warwick
30 Physical Olivia Newton John
31 I Can’t Go For That Hall and Oates
32 Crazy Little Thing Called Love Queen
33 Africa Toto
34 At This Moment Billy Vera and the Beaters
35 Kyrie Mr. Mister
36 Shake You Down Gregory Abbott
37 I Love a Rainy Night Eddie Rabbitt
38 Lost in Your Eyes Debbie Gibson
39 Say You, Say Me Lionel Richie
40 (Just Like) Starting Over John Lennon
41 Seasons Change Expose
42 I Want to Know What Love Is Foreigner
43 Escape (The Pina Colada Song) Rupert Holmes
44 Baby, Come to Me Patti Austin and James Ingram
45 Could’ve Been Tiffany
46 Do That To Me One More Time Captain and Tennille
47 When I’m With You Sheriff
48 Please Don’t Go KC and the Sunshine Band
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2017 NCAA Bradley Terry Bracket #12 (March 6 – CHAMP WEEK 2)

BASED ON CURRENT RATINGS:  WEST v SOUTH, EAST v MIDWEST

WEST REGION (San Jose, CA)

  • (1) Gonzaga v (16) NC Central/Texas Southern
  • (8) Michigan v (9) South Carolina
  • (4) Florida State v (13) EAST TENNESSEE STATE
  • (5) SMU v (12) Vermont
  • (2) Louisville v (15) IONA
  • (7) Creighton v (10) Dayton
  • (3) Florida v (14) FLORIDA GULF COAST
  • (6) Iowa State v (11) Michigan State

EAST REGION (New York, NY)

  • (1) Villanova v (16) New Orleans/Mount Saint Mary’s
  • (8) Oklahoma State v (9) Northwestern
  • (4) Virginia v (13) Texas-Arlington
  • (5) Saint Mary’s v (12) Middle Tennessee State
  • (2) Baylor v (15) Northern Kentucky
  • (7) Virginia Tech v (10) Arkansas
  • (3) Arizona v (14) Akron
  • (6) WICHITA STATE v (11) Clemson

MIDWEST REGION (Kansas City, MO)

  • (1) Kansas v (16) JACKSONVILLE STATE
  • (8) Minnesota v (9) Marquette
  • (4) Oregon v (13) Princeton
  • (5) Notre Dame v (12) Nevada
  • (2) North Carolina v (15) Omaha
  • (7) Wake Forest v (10) Seton Hall
  • (3) West Virginia v (14) Bucknell
  • (6) Wisconsin v (11) USC/Indiana

SOUTH REGION (Memphis, TN)

  • (1) UCLA v (16) UC-Irvine
  • (8) Maryland v (9) Kansas State
  • (4) Duke v (13) WINTHROP
  • (5) Cincinnati v (12) Providence/VCU
  • (2) Kentucky v (15) Eastern Washington
  • (7) Miami-FL v (10) Xavier
  • (3) Purdue v (14) New Mexico State
  • (6) Butler v (11) UNC-WILMINGTON

Last four byes: Kansas State, Baylor, Michigan State, Clemson

Last four in: USC, Providence, VCU, Indiana

First four out: Syracuse, Vanderbilt, Texas Tech, Illinois

Next four out: Georgia, Iowa, TCU, Rhode Island

Four more: Illinois State, California, Utah, Houston

2017 NCAA Bradley Terry Bracket #11 (March 5 – CHAMP WEEK 1)

BASED ON CURRENT RATINGS:  WEST v SOUTH, EAST v MIDWEST

WEST REGION (San Jose, CA)

  • (1) Gonzaga v (16) NC Central/Texas Southern
  • (8) Michigan v (9) South Carolina
  • (4) Florida State v (13) East Tennessee State
  • (5) SMU v (12) Vermont
  • (2) Louisville v (15) Iona
  • (7) Creighton v (10) Dayton
  • (3) Florida v (14) FLORIDA GULF COAST
  • (6) Iowa State v (11) Michigan State

EAST REGION (New York, NY)

  • (1) Villanova v (16) New Orleans/Mount Saint Mary’s
  • (8) Oklahoma State v (9) Northwestern
  • (4) Virginia v (13) Texas-Arlington
  • (5) Saint Mary’s v (12) UNC-Wilmington
  • (2) Baylor v (15) Northern Kentucky
  • (7) Virginia Tech v (10) Arkansas
  • (3) Arizona v (14) Akron
  • (6) WICHITA STATE v (11) Clemson

MIDWEST REGION (Kansas City, MO)

  • (1) Kansas v (16) JACKSONVILLE STATE
  • (8) Minnesota v (9) Marquette
  • (4) Oregon v (13) Princeton
  • (5) Notre Dame v (12) Nevada
  • (2) North Carolina v (15) South Dakota
  • (7) Wake Forest v (10) Seton Hall
  • (3) West Virginia v (14) Bucknell
  • (6) Wisconsin v (11) USC/Indiana

SOUTH REGION (Memphis, TN)

  • (1) UCLA v (16) UC-Irvine
  • (8) Maryland v (9) Kansas State
  • (4) Duke v (13) WINTHROP
  • (5) Cincinnati v (12) Providence/VCU
  • (2) Kentucky v (15) Eastern Washington
  • (7) Miami-FL v (10) Xavier
  • (3) Purdue v (14) New Mexico State
  • (6) Butler v (11) Middle Tennessee

Last four byes: Kansas State, Baylor, Michigan State, Clemson

Last four in: USC, Providence, VCU, Indiana

First four out: Syracuse, Vanderbilt, Texas Tech, Illinois

Next four out: Georgia, Iowa, TCU, Rhode Island

Four more: Illinois State, California, Utah, Houston

2017 NCAA Bradley Terry Bracket #10 (thru February 26)

BASED ON CURRENT RATINGS:  WEST v SOUTH, EAST v MIDWEST

WEST REGION (San Jose, CA)

  • (1) Gonzaga v (16) UC-Irvine/Texas Southern
  • (8) Michigan v (9) Dayton
  • (4) Virginia v (13) Monmouth
  • (5) Butler v (12) Nevada
  • (2) Florida v (15) Akron
  • (7) Miami-FL v (10) Marquette
  • (3) Baylor v (14) New Mexico State
  • (6) Cincinnati v (11) Kansas State/TCU

EAST REGION (New York, NY)

  • (1) Villanova v (16) New Orleans/Mount Saint Mary’s
  • (8) South Carolina v (9) Wake Forest
  • (4) Purdue v (13) Texas-Arlington
  • (5) Notre Dame v (12) Vermont
  • (2) Louisville v (15) Bucknell
  • (7) Minnesota v (10) VCU
  • (3) West Virginia v (14) UNC-Asheville
  • (6) Creighton v (11) Clemson

MIDWEST REGION (Kansas City, MO)

  • (1) Kansas v (16) North Dakota
  • (8) Maryland v (9) Arkansas
  • (4) Florida State v (13) East Tennessee State
  • (5) Saint Mary’s v (12) USC/Providence
  • (2) North Carolina v (15) Florida Gulf Coast
  • (7) Wichita State v (10) Michigan State
  • (3) Arizona v (14) Valparaiso
  • (6) Oklahoma State v (11) Seton Hall

SOUTH REGION (Memphis, TN)

  • (1) UCLA v (16) NC Central
  • (8) Iowa State v (9) Northwestern
  • (4) Duke v (13) Belmont
  • (5) SMU vs (12) UNC-Wilmington
  • (2) Kentucky v (15) South Dakota
  • (7) Virginia Tech v (10) Xavier
  • (3) Oregon v (14) Princeton
  • (6) Wisconsin v (11) Middle Tennessee

Last four byes: CMarquette, VCU, Seton Hall, Clemson

Last four in: Kansas State, USC, Providence, TCU

First four out: Indiana, California, Georgia, Texas Tech

Next four out: Illinois, Syracuse, Vanderbilt, Illinois State

Four more: Pittsburgh, Tennessee, Rhode Island, Houston

2017 NCAA Bradley Terry Bracket #8 (thru February 19)

BASED ON CURRENT RATINGS:  WEST v SOUTH, EAST v MIDWEST

WEST REGION (San Jose, CA)

  • (1) Gonzaga v (16) UC-Irvine/Texas Southern
  • (8) Iowa State v (9) Dayton
  • (4) Virginia v (13) Nevada
  • (5) Creighton v (12) East Tennessee State
  • (2) UCLA v (15) Akron
  • (7) Oklahoma State v (10) Wake Forest
  • (3) North Carolina v (14) Princeton
  • (6) Butler v (11) Arkansas

EAST REGION (New York, NY)

  • (1) Villanova v (16) New Orleans/Mount Saint Mary’s
  • (8) South Carolina v (9) Kansas State
  • (4) Wisconsin v (13) Texas-Arlington
  • (5) Florida State v (12) Vermont
  • (2) Baylor v (15) Bucknell
  • (7) Wichita State v (10) Clemson
  • (3) Duke v (14) Valparaisos
  • (6) Maryland v (11) Seton Hall/TCU

MIDWEST REGION (Kansas City, MO)

  • (1) Kansas v (16) North Dakota
  • (8) Northwestern v (9) VCU
  • (4) Oregon v (13) Monmouth
  • (5) Notre Dame v (12) UNC-Wilmington
  • (2) Florida v (15) Florida Gulf Coast
  • (7) Virginia Tech v (10) Michigan
  • (3) Arizona v (14) New Mexico State
  • (6) SMU v (11) Michigan State/Texas Tech

SOUTH REGION (Memphis, TN)

  • (1) Louisville v (16) NC Central
  • (8) Minnesota v (9) USC
  • (4) West Virginia v (13) Belmont
  • (5) Saint Mary’s vs (12) Middle Tennessee
  • (2) Kentucky v (15) North Dakota State
  • (7) Xavier v (10) Miami-FL
  • (3) Purdue v (14) UNC-Asheville
  • (6) Cincinnati v (11) Marquette

Last four byes: Clemson, Wake Forest, Arkansas, Marquette

Last four in: Michigan State, Seton Hall, TCU, Texas Tech

First four out: Tennessee, Indiana, California, Georgia

Next four out: Pittsburgh, Providence, Georgia Tech, Syracuse

Four more: Georgetown, Illinois State, Illinois, Vanderbilt

2017 NCAA Bradley Terry Bracket #8 (thru February 12)

BASED ON CURRENT RATINGS:  WEST v MIDWEST, EAST v SOUTH

WEST REGION (San Jose, CA)

  • (1) Gonzaga v (16) UC-Irvine/Texas Southern
  • (8) Kansas State v (9) Virginia Tech
  • (4) Wisconsin v (13) Valparaiso
  • (5) Oregon v (12) Nevada
  • (2) Kentucky v (15) Bucknell
  • (7) Northwestern v (10) Wake Forest
  • (3) UCLA v (14) New Mexico State
  • (6) Butler v (11) VCU

EAST REGION (New York, NY)

  • (1) Villanova v (16) New Orleans/Mount Saint Mary’s
  • (8) Iowa State v (9) Dayton
  • (4) Purdue v (13) Texas-Arlington
  • (5) Notre Dame v (12) Vermont
  • (2) Virginia v (15) Florida Gulf Coast
  • (7) Xavier v (10) TCU
  • (3) Arizona v (14) Akron
  • (6) Maryland v (11) Seton Hall/Tennessee

SOUTH REGION (Memphis, TN)

  • (1) Baylor v (16) Weber State
  • (8) Wichita State v (9) Miami-FL
  • (4) Duke v (13) Monmouth
  • (5) Creighton v (12) UNC-Wilmington
  • (2) Florida v (15) Princeton
  • (7) Oklahoma State v (10) Clemson
  • (3) Florida State v (14) UNC-Asheville
  • (6) SMU v (11) California

MIDWEST REGION (KANSAS CITY, MO)

  • (1) Kansas v (16) NC Central
  • (8) Minnesota v (9) USC
  • (4) North Carolina v (13) East Tennessee State
  • (5) Cincinnati v (12) Michigan State/Marquette
  • (2) Louisville v (15) North Dakota State
  • (7) South Carolina v (10) Michigan
  • (3) West Virginia v (14) Belmont
  • (6) Saint Mary’s v (11) Middle Tennessee

Last four byes: TCU, Clemson, VCU, California

Last four in: Michigan State, Seton Hall, Tennessee, Marquette

First four out: Indiana, Syracuse, Arkansas, Texas Tech

Next four out: Georgia, Georgetown, Georgia Tech, Providence

Four more: Pittsburgh, Illinois State, Rhode Island, Ohio State

Every #1 Song of the 1980s – Series 2

Well, after a rather long pause – the second round.  This takes us through to Valentine’s Day on each of the years in question.  The ground rules and such are here.  The new additions here?

“Rock With You” by Michael Jackson (1980) – The clear number one of songs that were number one on a particular day I care about, this was the second #1 from Off the Wall, one of the greatest brand extensions in pop culture history.  He died as a rather creepy serial weirdo, but it is impossible to explain to the kiddos how big a deal Michael Jackson was.  His canon still holds. (48 points)

“Down Under” by Men At Work (1983) – Honestly, there are very few songs which evoke the decade like this one. The video is unforgettable, and honestly – it still shapes my mind of what Australia actually looks like. Needless to say, I do not read a lot. (44 points)

“The Tide is High” by Blondie (1981) – Seriously, Blondie almost seems too good to lump into a survey of pop songs. Deborah Harry’s studied super-cool indifference is extremely magnetic, charismatic from anti-charisma as it were. This is probably my favorite of their big hits. (42 points)

“Centerfold” by The J Geils Band (1982) – The best popular song Boston has ever produced by among the best bands it has produced. It was the number one in the Top 40 flashback Sirius did this past week. There is nothing that is not compulsively listenable or singable about this. Off topic, power rankings from Boston (42 points)

1. Centerfold
2. Love to Love You by Donna Summer
27. You’ve Got a Friend by James Taylor
772. Summer Girls by LFO

“Celebration” by Kool and the Gang (1981) – If you have ever been to a wedding in the States, this might have happened. The song has aged well in its intended form. Sometimes it doesn’t need to be profound. If Earth, Wind and Fire were not a thing, Kool and the Gang would be way up there if all you wanted to do was be happy. (38 points)

“Karma Chameleon” by Culture Club (1984) – Boy George was the first androgenous pop star I remembered. While this is not the band’s best song – it’s awfully close. Hell, “Time won’t give me time” from that song probably explains the conundrum of life better than anything any philosopher has written. The video datelines “Mississippi, 1870” which contradicts how I pictured Reconstruction. It is hard to listen to this without smiling. (38 points)

“So Emotional” by Whitney Houston (1988) – She’ll come up a lot in this series. I have written about her before when she died. This was probably her fastest song – and certainly one which does not underline her chops. But it’s less croony qualities work really well. Honestly, when you see how hard dealing with stuff was for her, it is striking just how natural and easy this stuff looked. (38 points)

“Need You Tonight” by INXS (1988) – Actually, I remember the “Mediate” second half of the video more. INXS was one of the better more consistent acts of the decade – with a distinctive sound. This was their biggest hit, with a VMA winning video (back when that was something which you’d remember). (38 points)

“Two Hearts” by Phil Collins (1989) – I like Phil Collins. This is not something I will defend. It clearly will color the rankings here. He is often derivative of his influences, but fortunately those influences are things I like too. This is a pretty clear attempt to reach back to 1960s Britpop – and it actually works on that dimension. (38 points)

“Got My Mind Set on You” by George Harrison (1988) – This is a pretty silly, kind of indefensible song. But it’s George Harrison – and there is so much cheeky charm, that you kind of go with it. It has the same spirit of the Beatles. The Beatles, especially early, evoked smiles – this made me smile. (37 points)

“My Prerogative” by Bobby Brown (1989) – 1989 is really the year I got into pop music generally. This was near the top of the pops at the time – I think the Don’t Be Cruel record was one of the first tapes I owned. This was actually kind of risque 27 years ago. Of course, it looks quaint now. (37 points)

“Owner of a Lonely Heart” by Yes (1984) – Obejctively, one of the best pure songs on the list. I don’t have the same affection as for others – and it’s my list dammit. But this is a legitimately outstanding prog rock piece. (36 points)

“Open Your Heart” by Madonna (1987) – Honestly, this qualifies as lesser Madonna for me. This is still ridiculously evocative and the song itself is not bad. But really, looking at other stuff which she did in the 1980s, there were better songs. Of course, there is the peep show – ever the marketer. (36 points)

“The Way You Make Me Feel” by Michael Jackson (1988) – The third single from Bad. This is a lesser Michael Jackson entry – which actually shows how high his floor was in his heyday. (35 pts)

“Straight Up” by Paula Abdul (1989) – For better or for worse, this unleashed Paula Abdul on the American psyche, and thus made her eligible to be a has-been by the time American Idol rolled around. The bonus Arsenio Hall appearance here is an extra point. He was cool once (?) (35 points)

“I Can’t Go For That” by Hall and Oates (1982) – We discussed them in the first entry of this series. The videos are just so awkward. This is not one of my favorite songs of their. (33 points)

“That’s What Friends Are For” by Dionne Warwick and Friends (1986) – It’s pretty soppy, and the video has a lot of overacting. It’s a pleasant enough song – but it’s real virtue is Elton John’s curious wardrobe choice here. I am not sure whether Laurence Fishburne used it as inspiration for his gear on Pee Wee’s Playhouse, but I’d understand. (33 points)

“Africa” by Toto (1983) – Toto is one of those bands who have done more songs than you think. That 99 song, “Hold The Line”, “Rosanna”. This is their best though, and the video shows some of the characteristics of more ambitious stuff as MTV inspired these things to be more cinematic, and thus sillier. (32 points)

“At This Moment” by Billy Vera and the Beaters (1987) – Given that it’s revival was launched by a TV show (Family Ties), it had to have a high rating for 80’s zeitgeist. It’s a good song, but one I don’t remember honestly without looking it up otherwise. (30 points)

“Shake You Down” by Gregory Abbott (1987) – This is a song I like better than I should, given the genre and tempo. It is pretty dated now – but somehow the smoothness works for me still. (29 points)

“I Want to Know What Love Is” by Foreigner (1985) – Despite the extra points for Lou Gramm’s rather spectacular hair, this is a pretty lousy turn for a fairly entertaining 70s rock band. The part when the choir comes in is particularly snort inducing. (24 points)

“Escape (The Pina Colada Song)” by Rupert Holmes (1980) – Like “Please Don’t Go”, this song really reads 70s more than anything. It is funny and cheesy, but hard to rank up there at all. (23 points)

“Could’ve Been” by Tiffany (1988) – The other big Tiffany hit, and does not age well at all. The earnestness combined with the tempo combined with her just not being that talented makes this hard to sit through. (22 points)

“When I’m With You” by Sheriff (1989) – The 80s were all about rock ballads. This is a particularly bad one. (20 points)

The Big Board

Song Artist
1 Rock With You Michael Jackson
2 Down Under Men At Work
3 Faith George Michael
4 Like a Virgin Madonna
5 Centerfold J Geils Band
6 The Tide Is High Blondie
7 Walk Like an Egyptian Bangles
8 Karma Chameleon Culture Club
9 Celebration Kool and the Gang
10 So Emotional Whitney Houston
11 Two Hearts Phil Collins
12 Need You Tonight INXS
13 Every Rose Has Its Thorn Poison
14 My Prerogative Bobby Brown
15 Got My Mind Set on You George Harrison
16 Owner of a Lonely Heart Yes
17 Maneater Darryl Hall and John Oates
18 Open Your Heart Madonna
19 Say, Say, Say Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson
20 Straight Up Paula Abdul
21 The Way You Make Me Feel Michael Jackson
22 That’s What Friends Are For Dionne Warwick
23 Physical Olivia Newton John
24 I Can’t Go For That Hall and Oates
25 Africa Toto
26 At This Moment Billy Vera and the beaters
27 Shake You Down Gregory Abbott
28 Say You, Say Me Lionel Richie
29 (Just Like) Starting Over John Lennon
30 I Want to Know What Love Is Foreigner
31 Escape (The Pina Colada Song) Rupert Holmes
32 Could’ve Been Tiffany
33 When I’m With You Sheriff
34 Please Don’t Go KC and the Sunshine Band